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Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

3 edition of Race, rigor, and selectivity in U.S. engineering found in the catalog.

Race, rigor, and selectivity in U.S. engineering

Amy E. Slaton

Race, rigor, and selectivity in U.S. engineering

the history of an occupational color line

by Amy E. Slaton

  • 280 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Harvard University Press in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Engineering -- Study and teaching -- United States -- History,
  • Discrimination in education -- United States -- History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementAmy E. Slaton.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsT73 .S487 2010
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23606350M
    ISBN 109780674036192
    LC Control Number2009024813
    OCLC/WorldCa319493416

    Selectivity and Rigor in Research Universities. By Braxton, John M. the number of books in an institution's library, or the scholarly productivity of an institution's faculty [2]. Selectivity is the best single predictor of the reputation or prestige of a college or university [3, 32] and is highly associated with such resource criteria as. Race and Racisms: A Critical Approach, Second Edition, engages students in significant--and timely--questions related to racial dynamics in the U.S. and around the world. Written in accessible, straightforward language, the book discusses and critically analyzes cutting-edge scholarship in the field.

    Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in US Engineering: The History of an Occupational Color Line  Borrego, Maura Jenkins (Johns Hopkins Univ Press, ) Definitions of Interdisciplinary Research: Toward Graduate-Level Interdisciplinary Learning Outcomes . This program will be an online livestream lecture. Click on "find out more" below for information on how to access the free program. Despite efforts to diversify the academic pipeline, persistence of underrepresented and minoritized African American, Latinx, and Native American/Pacific Islander students in STEM undergraduate & PhD programs continues to be a challenge. This talk will .

    The Review of Higher Education (RHE) is considered one of the leading research journals in the field as it keeps scholars, academic leaders, and public policymakers abreast of critical issues facing higher education today. RHE advances the study of college and university issues by publishing peer-reviewed empirically, historically and theoretically based articles and scholarly . Students who complain that their college courses are too difficult may have found a new friend in one Purdue engineering professor who is claiming that the concept of academic rigor .


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Race, rigor, and selectivity in U.S. engineering by Amy E. Slaton Download PDF EPUB FB2

Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering pursues this question and its ramifications through historical case studies. Focusing on engineering programs in three settings―in Maryland, Illinois, and Texas, from the s through the s―Amy E.

Slaton examines efforts to expand black opportunities in engineering as well as obstacles 5/5(1). Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering: The History of an Occupational Color Line by Amy E. Slaton () Hardcover – January 1, out of 5 stars 1 rating See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions5/5(1).

Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering pursues this question and its ramifications through historical case studies. Focusing on engineering programs in three settings—in Maryland, Illinois, and Texas, from the s through the s— Amy E.

Slaton examines efforts to expand black opportunities in engineering as well as obstacles. Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering pursues this question and its ramifications through historical case studies.

Focusing on engineering programs in three settings--in Maryland, Illinois, and Texas, and selectivity in U.S. engineering book the s through the s--Amy E. Race examines efforts to expand black opportunities in engineering as well rigor obstacles to.

Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering pursues this question and its ramifications through historical case studies. Focusing on engineering programs in three settings—in Maryland, Illinois, and Texas, from the s through the s—Amy E.

Slaton examines efforts to expand black opportunities in engineering as well as obstacles. Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering: The History of an Occupational Color Line. By Amy E. Slaton (Cambridge, Mass., Harvard.

Texas A&M University The both tried a new way to attack the problem of race in the engineering field. They tried to make programs that would included minorities in all aspects of engineering. They both were never able to get past the same problems that the rest of the.

Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering: The History of an Occupational Color Line by Amy E. Slaton TERRY S. REYNOLDS Article. How Britain lost its early dominance in computing by systematically discriminating against its most qualified workers: women.

InBritain led the world in electronic computing. Bythe British computer industry was all but extinct. What happened in the intervening thirty years holds lessons for all postindustrial superpowers.

As Britain struggled to use technology to retain its. Slaton is also interested in understandings of technical aptitude in American manufacturing and engineering more generally, with particular emphasis on the role of race. Her most recent book is "Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S.

Engineering: The History of an Occupational Color Line" (Harvard University Press, ). Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering. is an important text for historians of higher educa-tion, engineering education scholars, and those in-terested in science, technology, and society.

Slaton relies on case studies; as a result, she does not pro-vide a comprehensive history of racial disparities. Get this from a library. Race, rigor, and selectivity in U.S. engineering: the history of an occupational color line. [Amy E Slaton] -- "Despite the educational and professional advances made by minorities in recent decades, African Americans remain woefully under-represented in the fields of science.

technology, mathematics, and. Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering: The History of an Occupational Color Line by Amy E. Slaton Article in History of Education Quarterly 51(1).

Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering The History of an Occupational Color Line. Amy E. Slaton. Race and the New Meritocracy: Engineering Education in the Texas A&M System, to the Present please find the introduction to Nolan’s book.

On the morning of JCaptain James F. Nolan, MD. List of books written by Amy E. Slaton - Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering; Reinforced Concrete. Read more here. Her most recent book, Race, Rigor and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering: The History of an Occupational Color Line (Harvard University Press, ), follows racial ideologies in engineering higher education since the s.

Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering [Amy E. Slaton] Rahva Raamatust. Kohaletoimetamine alates 24h ja tasuta. Focusing on engineering.

The University of Chicago Press. Books Division. Chicago Distribution Center. —Amy E. Slaton, Professor of History, Drexel University; author of Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering: The History of an Occupational Color Line “Computing is widely recognized as a male-dominated field, but how did it come to be this way.

Amy Slaton, PhD, a professor in the Department of History of Drexel’s College of Arts and Sciences, was excited to find that the report draws on her historical study, Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering: The History of an Occupational Color Line (Harvard University Press, ).

Slaton is also interested in understandings of technical aptitude in American manufacturing and engineering, with particular emphasis on the role of race.

Her most recent book is Race, Rigor, and Selectivity in U.S. Engineering: The History of an Occupational Color Line (Harvard University Press, ). To the Editor: Re “STEM Education Has Little to Do With Flowers” (Basics, Oct.

5): I share your columnist Natalie Angier’s dislike of glib .A formal application to Hillsdale College includes: (1) a completed application form; (2) the scores from either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), the American College Test (ACT), or the Classic Learning Test (CLT); (3) an official transcript of high school grades (and post-secondary grades, if available); (4) thoughtful essay and short answer responses; (5) two academic letters of.